The Bespoke Blog

Making of Bespoke: The Story of our Shop, Chapter 1

Transient

               This story is going to be long, so brace yourself. I intend to tell you everything but not all at once, don't worry. This first "chapter," I am focusing on the interior of our shop, namely the "gallery wall," which was the first wall painted in the shop. So here goes...

My Grandmother Betty loved the Flora and Fauna of the United States and in many ways this wall is dedicated to her. She and my grandfather would spend their summers in a fifth wheel trailer in the middle of a state park somewhere,  and return each winter to Florida.  When we would visit them, I would look through her numerous Audubon Society Bird and Tree books studying them like a religion. When my Grandmother passed I only wished for one thing, her bird books. They seemed to almost be a diary of her relationship with nature. She would document when and where she saw each bird and on an occasion she would  write a side note about the circumstances which lead her to the sighting.  For these memories and many more I decided to create a wall dedicated to the Flora and Fauna of the United States. When I had a chance meeting with an artist who created just that, I knew it was meant to be. And so with no further ado, I present to you the story of our Unted States Flora and Fauna wall installation. 

Had it not been for a chance meeting with a friend who doubles as a color expert, we would not have ended up where we did. That is to say we had always just assumed we would paint the wall white, or at least a light shade and draw the outlines in black. It took her about 1 minute to convince us otherwise, and out of that meeting we decided on a dark eggplant purple. We haven't ever looked back. Once the wall was primed and painted we started in on the process of transferring the image to the wall. 

This process couldn't be easier. All you need is a projector, paint (in our case I used a white paint pen) an image and time (the above picture was taken around 12am - we found time where we could). The only trick to projecting onto large walls is to make sure you can get far enough away in order to fill the space. In our case we had to cut the image in half and do one side at a time. Only the trained eye, or the person drawing the states (eh- hum, me) would notice that North Dakota is a bit bent out of shape because of cutting the image in half. 

All of the finishing touches were done in the light of the day.  At the end of the next day, after nailing in approximitely 102 nails, our gallery wall was complete and we were ready to install all of the 51 (they also do the District of Columbia) Dutch Door Press State cards and move on to the next project.